A randomized controlled trial of three low-dose gonadotrophin protocols for unexplained infertility Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This randomized controlled trial assessed which of three low-intensity ovulation induction protocols was associated with the highest rate of cycle completion among infertile women undergoing intrauterine insemination (IUI) with their husband's spermatozoa. Sixty-three women aged < or = 42 years with normospermic partners participated in the study. The primary diagnosis of infertility was unexplained in 89% of subjects, endometriosis in 6% and tubal factor in 5%. Women were assigned to three groups according to recombinant FSH dosage: group A received two ampoules (75 IU FSH per ampoule) on cycle day 4, and one ampoule on days 6 and 8 (total four ampoules); group B received two ampoules on days 4, 6 and 8 (total six ampoules); group C received two ampoules on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 (total eight ampoules). Daily ultrasound investigations began on cycle day 9-12 and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) 5000 IU was administered when one or two follicles > or = 18 mm were seen. IUI was scheduled for the next day. HCG was given and/or ovulation shown to have occurred in 88 of 109 cycles attempted (81%) with no differences among the three dose groups. Two singleton pregnancies occurred (2.3% per ovulatory cycle and 1.8% per cycle start). There were no significant differences among the three regimes in terms of cycle parameters, suggesting that an individualized and more intensive approach to ovarian stimulation is necessary for many women with unexplained infertility.

publication date

  • June 1, 1998