A Canadian survey on the management of corticosteroid induced osteoporosis by rheumatologists. Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To survey the practice pattern of Canadian rheumatologists (CR) on their management of corticosteroid induced osteoporosis in their premenopausal (PrM) and postmenopausal (PoM) female patients. METHODS: The practice pattern was surveyed using a 17 item questionnaire probing the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and monitoring of osteoporosis in PrM and PoM women receiving longterm oral systemic corticosteroid therapy. RESULTS: Most CR investigated and treated osteoporosis themselves, 13% referred to other specialists for investigation, and 22% referred for treatment. Eighty-two percent of CR used dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to confirm a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Most CR initiated investigation for osteoporosis at the start or within the first year of starting longterm systemic corticosteroid therapy: PrM 87% and PoM 93%. The most frequently used initial strategy for the prevention of osteoporosis was as follows. PrM: calcium and vitamin D3 (53%); PoM: hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and calcium (29%). The most common initial choice for treatment of established osteoporosis was as follows: PrM: etidronate (53%); PoM: bisphosphonates +/- HRT (53%). Ninety-six percent of CR used only bone mineral density (BMD) measurement to monitor therapy for corticosteroid induced osteoporosis. Most CR monitored BMD every 12 to 24 months for PrM (81%) and PoM (84%). The BMD parameter(s) (T and Z scores as measured by DEXA) used to initiate therapy for corticosteroid induced osteoporosis was variable. CONCLUSION: It appears that, while certain trends are evident, there is still considerable variability in the management of corticosteroid induced osteoporosis.

publication date

  • June 2000

has subject area