An orally active non-selective endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, markedly reduces injury in a rat model of colitis Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Activation of endothelial cells by vasoactive mediators, such as endothelins, may be an early, strategically important step in the initiation of inflammation in the intestine. In view of recent evidence that inflammatory bowel disease is associated with elevated intestinal concentrations of endothelins and upregulated expression of endothelin receptors on vascular endothelium in intestine, endothelins may become therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The recent availability of an orally active, mixed endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, allowed us to examine the role of endothelins in a rat model of colitis. Colitis was induced by intra-rectal administration of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. In each treatment group, rats were treated with bosentan (10-60 mg/kg p.o.) 24 and 2 h prior to (pre-dose) or 1 h after the induction (post-induction) of colitis and all animals were treated every 24 h thereafter for 5 days. On day 6, stool consistency and the presence of adhesions in the peritoneal cavity were accessed. Colonic tissue samples were removed for determination of macroscopic and microscopic tissue injury, and myeloperoxidase activity. Colitis was typified by tissue ulceration in the distal colon and a corresponding 35-fold increase in myeloperoxidase activity compared to non-inflamed controls. Daily treatment with bosentan dose-dependently reduced colonic damage and myeloperoxidase activity when bosentan was given prior to induction of colitis. In the pre-dose group, the greatest beneficial effect of bosentan was observed at 60 mg/kg; colonic damage and granulocyte infiltration were attenuated by > 80%. A partial therapeutic effect of bosentan was also observed at 60 mg/kg when the pre-treatment regimen was excluded. These findings demonstrate that an orally active, mixed endothelin receptor antagonist has marked protective and therapeutic effects in an animal model of colitis.

authors

publication date

  • August 1996

has subject area