Hypotonic shock stimulates ascorbate release from coronary artery endothelial cells by a Ca2+-independent pathway Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • In endothelial cells, anion channels open upon osmotic swelling during shear stress and hypotonic shock. Therefore, we examined the effects of hypotonic shock on release of the antioxidant anion ascorbate from pig coronary artery endothelial cells. Hypotonic shock potentiated ascorbate release from freshly isolated or cultured pig coronary artery endothelial cells; subsequently cultured endothelial cells were used. The hypotonic shock-induced increase in Asc release was rapid, depended on the degree of hypotonic shock, and not due to membrane leakiness. Stimulating P2Y2 like receptors in endothelial cells with ATP causes ascorbate release via a Ca2+ -mediated pathway. Hypotonic shock-induced release differed from the Ca2+-mediated Asc release because: (a) the increase in release with hypotonic shock was additive to that with ATP or A23187 (Ca2+ -ionophore), (b) apyrase, suramin or removing extracellular Ca2+ did not affect the hypotonic shock-stimulated release, (c) anion channel blockers inhibited the release by the two pathways differently, and (d) hypotonic shock increased the ascorbate release from endothelial cells and cultured smooth muscle cells whereas the Ca2+ -mediated ascorbate release occurred only in endothelial cells. Accumulation of ascorbate by endothelial cells was examined at extracellular ascorbate concentrations of 10 (Na+ -ascorbate symporter not saturated) and 5000 microM (Na+ -ascorbate symporter saturated). Hypotonic shock and A23187 decreased ascorbate accumulation at 10 microM ascorbate but increased it at 5000 microM. The effects of the two treatments were additive and also differed from each other with substitution of gluconate for extracellular chloride. Thus, ascorbate release from endothelial cells can be potentiated by two distinct pathways - hypotonic shock mediated and ATP/Ca2+ stimulated.

publication date

  • October 2006

has subject area