Structural alterations of blood vessels in hypertensive rats Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Vascular changes in the mesenteric arteries were examined in three animals models for human essential hypertension. These models are: spontaneously hypertensive rats, which develop hypertension with age; Dahl model of genetic, salt-dependent hypertensive rats; and deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertensive rats. Morphometric measurements of the arterial wall components (e.g., endothelium, media) were carried out in the elastic arteries, muscular arteries, and arteriolar vessels from the mesenteric bed. The observed changes were correlated with the stages of hypertension development and the effect of antihypertension therapy, including sympathectomy. Specific emphasis was made to determine whether the changes observed were primary in nature, and related to the causes of hypertension, or they were secondary adaptive changes. A comparison of the three models showed that common changes in the intima, media, and adventitia were present in the three models. Alterations in the endothelium (e.g., enlargement of subendothelial space, necrotic changes), adventitia (collagen increase), and hypertrophy of the smooth muscle cells are secondary adaptive changes, because these changes occur subsequent to the development of hypertension, and antihypertensive therapy also prevent these changes from taking place. In contrast, hyperplasia of the smooth muscle cells is a primary change, because it occurs prior to the onset of hypertension. Functionally, alteration in the media is probably the most important change, because it can cause hyperreactivity of the arteries in response to stimulation. Damage to the endothelial cells may play a role in the maintenance of hypertension during the later phase. Alteration in adventitia is a passive change, which does not appear to have a major role in hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • August 1987