NaHCO3 and KHCO3 ingestion rapidly increases renal electrolyte excretion in humans Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This paper describes and quantifies acute responses of the kidneys in correcting plasma volume, acid-base, and ion disturbances resulting from NaHCO(3) and KHCO(3) ingestion. Renal excretion of ions and water was studied in five men after ingestion of 3.57 mmol/kg body mass of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and, in a separate trial, potassium bicarbonate (KHCO(3)). Subjects had a Foley catheter inserted into the bladder and indwelling catheters placed into an antecubital vein and a brachial artery. Blood and urine were sampled in the 30-min period before, the 60-min period during, and the 210-min period after ingestion of the solutions. NaHCO(3) ingestion resulted in a rapid, transient diuresis and natriuresis. Cumulative urine output was 44 +/- 11% of ingested volume, resulting in a 555 +/- 119 ml increase in total body water at the end of the experiment. The cumulative increase (above basal levels) in renal Na(+) excretion accounted for 24 +/- 2% of ingested Na(+). In the KHCO(3) trial, arterial plasma K(+) concentration rapidly increased from 4.25 +/- 0.10 to a peak of 7.17 +/- 0.13 meq/l 140 min after the beginning of ingestion. This increase resulted in a pronounced, transient diuresis, with cumulative urine output at 270 min similar to the volume ingested, natriuresis, and a pronounced kaliuresis that was maintained until the end of the experiment. Cumulative (above basal) renal K(+) excretion at 270 min accounted for 26 +/- 5% of ingested K(+). The kidneys were important in mediating rapid corrections of substantial portions of the fluid and electrolyte disturbances resulting from ingestion of KHCO(3) and NaHCO(3) solutions.

publication date

  • February 2000

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