Effects of reduced free fatty acid availability on hormone-sensitive lipase activity in human skeletal muscle during aerobic exercise Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG); however, its regulation in skeletal muscle is poorly understood. To examine the effects of reduced free fatty acid (FFA) availability on HSL activity in skeletal muscle during aerobic exercise, 11 trained men exercised at 55% maximal O2 uptake for 40 min after the ingestion of nicotinic acid (NA) or nothing (control). Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and 5, 20, and 40 min of exercise. Plasma FFA were suppressed (P < 0.05) in NA during exercise ( approximately 0.40 +/- 0.04 vs. approximately 0.07 +/- 0.01 mM). The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was increased throughout exercise (0.020 + 0.008) after NA ingestion. However, the provision of energy from fat oxidation only decreased from 33% of the total in the control trial to 26% in the NA trial, suggesting increased IMTG oxidation in the NA trial. Mean HSL activity was 2.25 + 0.15 mmol x kg dry mass(-1) x min(-1) at rest and increased (P < 0.05) to 2.94 +/- 0.20 mmol x kg dry mass(-1) x min(-1) at 5 min in control. Contrary to the hypothesis, mean HSL was not activated to a greater extent in the NA trial during exercise (2.20 + 0.28 at rest to 2.88 + 0.21 mmol x kg dry mass(-1) x min(-1) at 5 min). No further HSL increases were observed at 20 or 40 min in both trials. There was variability in the response to NA ingestion, as some subjects experienced a large increase in RER and decrease in fat oxidation, whereas other subjects experienced no shift in RER and maintained fat oxidation despite the reduced FFA availability in the NA trial. However, even in these subjects, HSL activity was not further increased during the NA trial. In conclusion, reduced plasma FFA availability accompanied by increased epinephrine concentration did not further activate HSL beyond exercise alone.

publication date

  • November 2004