Neural control of canine colon motor function: studies in vitro Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The responses of strips of the canine colon to stimulation of intrinsic nerves and to the probable mediators of these nerves were studied in vitro. Studies were carried out using longitudinal and circular muscle strips from proximal and distal colon with field stimulation and addition of agents to the bath. Overall, these and other studies in vivo suggested that acetylcholine was an ubiquitous mediator of neural excitation. Norepinephrine had mixed inhibitory and excitatory effects, the latter only in circular muscle. Inhibitory effects of norepinephrine seemed to be both pre- and post-synaptic but no evidence that it was released by field stimulation was obtained. Substance P had excitatory effects chiefly by release of acetylcholine. It, in addition to norepinephrine, at least in circular muscle, deserves evaluation as the mediator of noncholinergic excitation to high frequency field stimulation. Although vasoactive intestinal peptide sometimes had inhibitory effects, these were incomplete and inconsistent. However, further evaluation of its possible role as a nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory mediator is required to determine if it is involved as one component in the response. Few qualitative differences existed between responses of various regions of the colon to potential neuromediators, although there were some consistent differences between responses of longitudinal and circular muscle. Some differences existed in responses obtained earlier in vivo and in vitro. In particular, inhibitory effects following excitation by substance P on field stimulation were found only in vivo. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory responses to field stimulation were consistently present only in vitro. These differences have not been explained.

publication date

  • March 1988