Differential catabolic fate of neuromedin N and neurotensin in the canine intestinal mucosa Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We have established the peptidase content of a P2 fraction (enriched in synaptosomes) and plasma membranes prepared from canine intestinal mucosa. Fourteen exo- and endopeptidases were assayed with fluorimetric or chromogenic substrates and identified by means of specific peptidase inhibitors. Post-proline dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV, aminopeptidase M, and carboxypeptidase A were the most abundant exopeptidases, while aminopeptidases A and B, dipeptidyl aminopeptidase, pyroglutamyl peptide hydrolase I, and carboxypeptidase B displayed little, if any, activity. Endopeptidase 24.11 was the only endopeptidase that was detected in high amount. By contrast, proline endopeptidase exhibited a low activity, while angiotensin-converting enzyme, endopeptidase 24.15, endopeptidase 24.16, and cathepsin B and D-like activities were not detected. The catabolic rates of the two related neuropeptides, neurotensin (NT) and neuromedin N (NN), established that NN was inactivated 16 to 24 times faster than NT by plasma membrane and P2 fractions, respectively. Furthermore, the two peptides underwent qualitatively distinct mechanisms of degradation. A phosphoramidon-sensitive formation of NT(1-10) was detected as the major NT catabolite, indicating that NT was susceptible to an endoproteolytic cleavage elicited by endopeptidase 24.11. By contrast, NN was inactivated by the action of an exopeptidase at its N-terminus, leading to the formation of [des-Lys1]NN. The occurrence of this NN metabolite was prevented by bestatin and actinonin, but not by the aminopeptidase B inhibitor, arphamenine B, indicating that the release of the N-terminal residue of NN was likely due to aminopeptidase M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • May 1993