Two-Site Ionic Labeling with Pyranine:  Implications for Structural Dynamics Studies of Polymers and Polypeptides by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) is widely used to study dynamic motions of biomolecules in a variety of environments. However, depolarization due to rapid side chain motions often complicates the interpretation of anisotropy decay data and interferes with the accurate observation of segmental motions. Here, we demonstrate a new method for two-point ionic labeling of polymers and biomolecules that have appropriately spaced amino groups using the fluorescent probe 8-hydroxyl-1,3,6-trisulfonated pyrene (pyranine). TRFA analysis shows that such labeling provides a more rigid attachment of the fluorophore to the macromolecule than the covalent or single-point ionic labeling of amino groups, leading to time-resolved anisotropy decays that better reflect the backbone motion of the labeled polymer segment. Optimal coupling of pyranine to biomolecule dynamics is shown to be obtained for appropriately spaced Arg groups, and in such cases the ionic binding is stable up to 150 mM ionic strength. TRFA was used to monitor the behavior of pyranine-labeled poly(allylamine) (PAM) and poly-d-lysine (PL) in sodium silicate derived sol-gel materials and revealed significant restriction of backbone motion upon entrapment for both polymers, an observation that was not readily apparent in a previous study with entrapped fluorescein-labeled PAM and PL. The implications of these findings for fluorescence studies of polymer and biomolecule dynamics are discussed.

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publication date

  • April 2006