Afterload as a predeterminant of haemodynamics and segmental wall motion following coronary artery occlusion Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Maximal changes in haemodynamics and segmental wall motion were seen 2 min after coronary occlusion and were examined in relation to the loading conditions of the left ventricle before occlusion in 20 open chest dogs. There was a significant inverse relationship between the preligation mean aortic pressure and the percentage decrease in stroke volume following ligation. This relationship was observed whether afterload was distributed randomly (mean aortic pressure ranging from 9.7 to 17.6 kPa [73 to 132 mmHg]) between all dogs (r = 0.65; P less than 0.001) or altered by methoxamine (+4 kPa [+30 mmHg]) and nitroprusside (-3.2 kPa [-24 mmHg]) within the same dog (r = 0.82; P less than 0.001; n = 8). Although occlusion of the anterior descending artery caused a small (+5.5%) but significant increase in end-diastolic length of the non-ischaemic epicardial segment, the capacity for compensatory ventricular dilatation was not dependent on preligation afterload. However, the capacity of the ischaemic segment to undergo systolic expansion was significantly greater (+30.2% of end-systolic segment length) in those dogs with the lowest preligation MAP (8 to 12 kPa [60 to 90 mmHg]) compared with systolic lengthening of only 15.8% in the high afterload group (15 to 18 kPa [112 to 135 mmHg]). These data indicate that the loading conditions of the left ventricle predetermine the extent of global and segmental left ventricular dysfunction during the early phase of acute ischaemic injury.

publication date

  • March 1, 1979