Career choices, work patterns and perceptions of undergraduate education of McMaster medical graduates: comparison between men and women. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A survey of the first six classes to graduate from McMaster University's medical school was carried out 5 years after graduation for the classes of 1972 to 1974 and 2 years after graduation for the classes of 1975 to 1977. Although the men and women entered similar fields of medicine the women were more likely to have taken time away from work and to be working fewer hours, and more women than men were influenced by their spouses in their career choices. More women than men expressed some dissatisfaction with the 3-year undergraduate program, and more women identified the "anxiety level created" as a weakness of the program. The women compared their preparation for the first year of postgraduate training with that of other trainees somewhat less favourably than did the men.

publication date

  • June 15, 1982

published in