Prolonged hemorrhagic shock does not impair regeneration of plasma coagulant masses in the rabbit Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Twelve adult male albino rabbits were assigned alternately to normotensive and hypotensive groups to assess the effect of hypovolemic shock on spontaneous correction of dilutional coagulopathy. All animals underwent dilutional exchange transfusion with 200 mL of rabbit RBCs and 5% human albumin. Half the animals were then acutely hemorrhaged and subsequent aliquots of blood removed as needed to maintain the mean arterial pressure at 40 mm Hg. RESULTS: By 6 hr after production of dilutional coagulopathy, masses and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen and Factor II had increased modestly but significantly, and Factor VII mass and concentration and in vitro coagulation had returned almost to normal; plasma volume was unchanged in the normotensive animals. In the hypovolemic shock animals, where coagulant mass regeneration was as rapid as in the normotensive animals, a doubling of total plasma volume (p less than .01) prevented the concentrations of fibrinogen and Factor II, and hence the coagulation times, from improving. CONCLUSIONS: Dilutional coagulopathy corrects spontaneously within hours. Normovolemic shock prolongs dilutional coagulopathy not by impairment of factor regeneration but because of further (internal) dilution due to plasma expansion. Rapid correction of dilutional coagulopathy is likely to necessitate cryoprecipitate administration.

publication date

  • February 1991