Interactions of corneal epithelial cells and surfaces modified with cell adhesion peptide combinations Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • In order to facilitate the adhesion of corneal epithelial cells to a poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) substrate ultimately for the development of a synthetic keratoprosthesis, PDMS surfaces were modified by covalent attachment of combinations of cell adhesion and synergistic peptides derived from laminin and fibronectin. Peptides studied included YIGSR and its synergistic peptide PDSGR from laminin and the fibronectin derived RGDS and PHSRN. Surfaces were modified with combinations of peptides determined by an experimental design. Peptide surface densities, measured using 125-I labeled tyrosine containing analogs, were on the order of pmol/cm2. Surface density varied as a linear function of peptide concentration in the reaction solution, and was different for the different peptides examined. The lowest surface density at all solution fractions was obtained with GYRGDS, while the highest density was consistently obtained with GYPDSGR. These results provide evidence that the surfaces were modified with multiple peptides. Water contact angles and XPS results provided additional evidence for differences in the chemical composition of the various surfaces. Significant differences in the adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells to the modified surfaces were noted. Statistical analysis of the experimental adhesion results suggested that solution concentration YIGSR, RGDS, and PHSRN as well as the interaction effect of YIGSR and PDSGR had a significant effect on cell interactions. Modification with multiple peptides resulted in greater adhesion than modification with single peptides only. Surface modification with a control peptide PPSRN in place of PHSRN resulted in a decrease in cell adhesion in virtually all cases. These results suggest that surface modification with appropriate combinations of cell adhesion peptides and synergistic peptides may result in improved cell surface interactions.

publication date

  • January 2002