Customizing our approach in deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment: overview of our clinical experience. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Until recently, the management of established deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism remained largely unchanged and unchallenged. Treatment comprised an initial intravenous bolus of unfractionated heparin (UFH), followed by dose-adjusted intravenous UFH for 5-7 days, and oral warfarin for three months. UFH is traditionally administered in hospital, and monitoring and dose adjustment remain essential features of both UFH and warfarin treatment, making therapy both costly and inconvenient. Recent clinical trials have shown that subcutaneous UFH, or low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), administered subcutaneously at a weight-adjusted fixed dose, are at least as effective as standard UFH given intravenously in the treatment of DVT. The feasibility of initial treatment of DVT at home in selected patients, with associated cost-savings and improved convenience have also been demonstrated with LMWHs. Clinical trials are currently investigating the potential value of LMWHs in the treatment of pulmonary embolism and as an alternative to warfarin in secondary prevention of DVT. The role of newer anticoagulants, such as recombinant hirudin, in initial treatment of DVT, and of thrombolysis in the management of pulmonary embolism remain to be defined.

publication date

  • August 1999