Applicants to B.Sc.N., R.N., and R.P.N. nursing programs: differences and predictors. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We surveyed 205 applicants to three types of nursing programs (B.Sc.N., diploma-R.N., and diploma-R.N.A.) offered in Toronto, Ontario. Applicants were predominately white, unmarried women living within commuting distance of the institutions to which they applied. Applicants to practical nursing programs tended to be older than applicants to B.Sc.N. and diploma-R.N. programs, be married, have at least one dependant, come from blue-collar families, be out of school longer, and submit fewer applications. Applicants with dependants were 11 times more likely to choose R.P.N. over R.N. programs. Recency of graduation and high school average were predictive of choosing B.Sc.N. over R.N. programs. While this 1992 cohort had some appreciation for the challenges facing the nursing profession, most applicants still expected to secure full-time employment in acute care post-graduation. The data provide an important benchmark for comparing current and future cohorts of applicants with respect to socio-demographic characteristics and expectations of nursing as a career choice.

publication date

  • 1997