Altered acetylcholinesterase isozyme patterns in mice with hereditary muscular dystrophy Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Normal and dystrophic mouse muscles were separated into a predominantly white muscle fraction (gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus) and a predominantly red muscle fraction (diaphragm). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was extracted from each muscle fraction using a Triton X-100/NaCl buffer. Six forms of AChE were separated from each muscle homogenate by velocity sedimentation on linear sucrose gradients. Their apparent sedimentation coefficients in each case were 19.7S, 16.0S, 13.3S, 10.4S, 7.6S, and 3.9S. Gel electrophoresis of crude muscle homogenates under nondenaturing conditions (native gels) and of ech separate isozyme fraction gave one band of AChE activity with a consistent Rf (relative mobility) value. Reelectrophoresis of native gel bands on SDS/acrylamide slab gels revealed a similar monomeric subunit protein from either crude muscle homogenates or isozyme fractions with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 69,000 daltons. Our results indicate that the AChE distribution and activity are severely affected in dystrophic "white" muscles (anaerobic) but much less so in "red" muscles (aerobic). Dystrophic predominantly white muscles weigh less, contain less protein, and have a decreased total AChE activity in comparison with their normal counterparts. Furthermore, the relative proportions of AChE activity in each isozyme fraction is altered between normal white and dystrophic white muscle fractions: i.e., dystrophic white muscle contains a decreased proportion of a low molecular weight form (7.6S) and increased proportions of higher molecular weight forms (16.0S, 19.7S). In contrast, no significant differences occur in AChE activity or distribution between normal and dystrophic predominantly red muscle. The changes in white muscle AChE are toward a pattern common to red muscle. This suggests that the effect of muscular dystrophy and its related stress on mouse white muscle is at least in part a shift from a predominantly anaerobic, fatigable metabolism to an aerobic, fatigue-resistant metabolism.

publication date

  • May 1981