Shortened cytoplasmic domain affects intracellular transport but not nuclear localization of a viral glycoprotein. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV) buds from the inner nuclear membrane of the infected cells. The glycoprotein gB-1 of HSV contains a stretch of 69 hydrophobic amino acids near the COOH terminus and a 109-amino acid cytoplasmic domain. By oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, five gB-1 mutants were constructed which either lack a cytoplasmic tail or contained 3, 6, 22, or 43 amino acids in the cytoplasmic tail. When expressed in COS cells all of the mutant glycoproteins were synthesized but the rate of intracellular transport and the appearance at the cell surface of the mutant gB-1 protein lacking the cytoplasmic tail or containing 3 and 6 amino acids in the cytoplasmic domain was drastically reduced. The wild-type gB-1 as well as all of the mutants in the cytoplasmic tail were, however, located on the nuclear envelope. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic domain of the glycoprotein gB may play a role in intracellular transport but not in the nuclear localization.

publication date

  • January 25, 1990

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