Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis in a Mammalian Cell-Line with a Temperature-Sensitive Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant tsH1, has been shown previously to contain a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase. At the non-permissive temperature of 40 degrees C cytosolic protein synthesis is rapidly inhibited. The protein synthesis which continues at 40 degrees C appears to be mitochondrial, since: (a) whole-cell protein synthesis at the permissive temperature of 34 degrees C is not inhibied by tevenel, the sulfamoyl analogue of chloramphenicol and a specific inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis; however, whole-cell protein synthesis at 40 degrees C is inhibited by tevenel, (b) Protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria from tsH1 cells is not significantly inhibited at 40 degrees C. (c) At 40 degrees C [14C]leucine is incorporated predominantly into the mitochondrial fraction of tsH1 cells. (d) The incorporation of [14C]leucine at 40 degrees C into mitochondrial proteins of tsH1 cells is inh-bited by tevenel but not by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the mitochondria of tsH1 cells contain a leucyl-tRNA synthetase which is different from the cytosolic enzyme. The inhibition of cytosolic, but not of mitochondrial protein synthesis in tsH1 cells at 40 degrees C allows the selective labelling of mitochondrial translation products in the absence of inhibitors. The mitochondrial translation products labelled in tsH1 cells at 40 degrees C and at 34 degrees C in the presence of cycloheximide have been compared by sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both conditions of labelling give similar profiles. The mitochondrial translation products are resolved into two components, one with an apparent molecular weight range from 40,000 to 20,000 and a second with an apparent molecular weight range from 20,000 to 10,000.

publication date

  • November 1975