Does the association between birth weight and blood pressure increase with age? A longitudinal study in young adults Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: To assess whether the association between birth weight and blood pressure (BP) increases with age using three different statistical methods. METHODS: A representative sample of 1232 study participants born between 1974-1978 in Limache, Chile were assessed in 2000-2002, of whom 796 were reassessed in 2010-2012. An 'amplification effect' was assessed by the change in the β coefficient in the two periods, the association between birth weight and the difference of BP overtime, and the interaction between birth weight and BP in the two periods. RESULTS: Birth weight was negatively associated with SBP in 2000-2002 (β = -2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) -3.77 to -1.16) and in 2010-2012 (β = -3.64, 95% CI -5.20 to -2.08), and with DBP in 2000-2002 (β = -1.26, 95% CI -2.23 to -0.29) , and 2010-2012 (β = -1.64, 95% CI -2.84 to -0.45) after adjustment for sex, physical activity, and BMI. There was no association between birth weight and the difference in BP between the two periods or the interaction between birth weight, BP, and time interval. CONCLUSION: Birth weight is a factor associated with BP in adults. This association increased with age, but amplification was shown only with one of the three methods.

publication date

  • June 2016