Primary intracranial pleomorphic angioleiomyoma—A New Morphologic Variant. An immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Angioleiomyomas usually are benign subcutaneous neoplasms that occur most often in extremities of middle-aged individuals. Very few cases have been described in other locations; none along the neuroaxis. An intracranial example of angioleiomyoma displaying unusual morphologic features not seen in the typical peripheral variants of this tumor is described. METHODS: The tumor was studied with conventional histology, immunohistochemistry with morphometric calculation of proliferation index, immunoelectron microscopy, and DNA flow cytometry. RESULTS: The tumor was composed of large epithelioid and pleomorphic cells filled with intermediate filaments positive for desmin and vimentin. Scattered cells also expressed myosin and muscle-specific actin. Smooth muscle cell differentiation was confirmed by ultrastructural demonstration of subplasmalemmal dense bodies, attachment plaques, and discontinuous basal lamina. The proliferation index with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) monoclonal antibody was 75.78%, whereas it was only 4.22% with Ki67 monoclonal antibodies adopted to paraffin material (MIB-1). CONCLUSION: The tumor represents a unique morphologic variant of a pleomorphic angioleiomyoma. Cellular pleomorphism and a strong reaction for PCNA in numerous cells suggested that the lesion was malignant. However, the absence of mitotic figures, a small number of Ki-67-positive cells, a diploic DNA pattern, and a low proliferation index in flow cytometry all supported the concept that this neoplasm represented an unusual histologic variant of benign angiogenic leiomyoma. Encapsulation and demarcation of the surgical specimen and the survival of the patient for more than 4 years without recurrence after resection support this interpretation.

authors

publication date

  • October 1, 1994

published in