Effect of voltage and cyclic AMP on frequency of slow-wave-type action potentials in canine colon smooth muscle. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • 1. A non-L-type calcium conductance is involved in the generation of the initial part of the slow-wave-type action potential in colonic smooth muscle. The present study addresses the question whether this conductance is voltage or metabolically activated. 2. Current-induced hyperpolarization increased frequency and amplitude of slow waves measured in Krebs solution. 3. The upstroke potential was 'isolated' from the slow wave by superfusion with 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution (NaCl was replaced by glucamine, nitrendipine was added). 4. Hyperpolarization up to -100 mV did not affect the upstroke potential frequency and increased its amplitude. Only hyperpolarization further than -100 mV decreased the frequency less than or equal to 20%, and reduced the amplitude less than or equal to 20%. 5. Depolarization did not affect the upstroke potential frequency. 6. Forskolin, but not 1,9-dideoxyforskolin dramatically decreased the upstroke potential frequency, without affecting other parameters including the resting membrane potential. 7. The effect of forskolin was mimicked by dibutyryl cyclic AMP, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not extracellular cyclic AMP. 8. The upstroke potential could not be evoked by depolarizing pulses after inhibition of activity by forskolin. 9. The effect of forskolin could be reversed by the calcium ionophore A23187. 10. In summary, voltage changes up to -40 mV and down to -100 mV do not, but changes in intracellular cyclic AMP do affect the frequency of the upstroke potential. 11. It is likely that intracellular metabolic activity, which may include cyclic AMP but not a voltage change, activates the conductance responsible for the generation of the upstroke potential.

publication date

  • October 1, 1991