Cerebral Palsy—Long-Term Medical, Functional, Educational, and Psychosocial Outcomes Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Cerebral palsy, typically diagnosed in childhood, clearly continues into adulthood. This study describes the long-term medical, functional, educational, and psychosocial outcomes of people with cerebral palsy. Of the 203 people with cerebral palsy diagnosed and treated at the Child Development Center in Tel Aviv between 1975 and 1994, 163 (80%; age range 8-30 years, mean age 18.9 years, and median age 19 years) participated in a cross-sectional telephone survey. Half the respondents have chronic health problems: 78% report they experience gross motor disability, of whom 22% are wheelchair users; 30% to 50% need help in various activities of daily living; 35% have mental retardation; 79% completed 12 years or more of schooling; 78% live with their parents; 25% have served in the army; 23% have a driver's license; and 23% work in competitive employment. The large majority is involved in varied leisure activities and report a high level of life satisfaction.

publication date

  • January 2010

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