Efficacy of Oral vs. Topical, or Combined Oral and Topical 5-Aminosalicylates, in Ulcerative Colitis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: Efficacy of 5-aminosalicylic acids (5-ASAs) in ulcerative colitis (UC) has been studied previously in meta-analyses. However, no recent meta-analysis has studied the relative efficacies of differing routes of administration. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials were searched (through May 2011). Eligible trials recruited adults with mildly to moderately active UC, or quiescent UC, and compared oral 5-ASAs with either topical 5-ASAs or a combination of oral and topical 5-ASAs. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain relative risk (RR) of failure to achieve remission in active UC, and RR of relapse of disease activity in quiescent UC, with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The number needed to treat (NNT) was calculated from the reciprocal of the risk difference. RESULTS: The search identified 3,061 citations, and 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible. Four compared topical with oral 5-ASAs in active UC remission, with an RR of no remission with topical 5-ASAs of 0.82 (95% CI=0.52-1.28). Four trials compared combined with oral 5-ASAs in active UC (RR of no remission=0.65; 95% CI=0.47-0.91; NNT=5). Three RCTs compared intermittent topical with oral 5-ASAs in preventing relapse of quiescent UC (RR=0.64; 95% CI=0.43-0.95; NNT=4), and two compared combined with oral 5-ASAs (RR of relapse=0.48; 95% CI=0.17-1.38). CONCLUSIONS: Combined 5-ASA therapy appeared superior to oral 5-ASAs for induction of remission of mildly to moderately active UC. Intermittent topical 5-ASAs appeared superior to oral 5-ASAs for preventing relapse of quiescent UC.

publication date

  • February 2012