Online training improves paramedics’ knowledge of autonomic dysreflexia management guidelines Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • STUDY DESIGN: Single-group pre-/post-test with 3- and 6-month follow-ups. OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of the 'ABCs of AD' educational module on immediate and longer-term changes in paramedics' knowledge and beliefs about using the autonomic dysreflexia clinical practice guidelines (AD-CPGs). SETTING: Canada. METHODS: A total of 119 paramedics completed an AD knowledge test and measures of attitudes, perceived control, self-efficacy, social pressure from patients and health-care professionals, and intentions to use the AD-CPGs before and 1 week, 3 months and 6 months after viewing 'ABCs of AD'. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in AD knowledge, attitudes and social pressure from patients to use the AD-CPGs from baseline to 1 week, 3 months and 6 months post viewing (all P<0.001). Self-efficacy and intentions increased 1 week post viewing (P<0.001), but returned to baseline levels at 3 and 6 months (P>0.05). There was no change in perceived control or social pressure from health-care professionals. AD knowledge and beliefs explained 50-61% of the variance in intentions to use the AD-CPGs. Attitudes, social pressure from patients and perceived behavioural control were significant unique predictors of intentions at all time points (P<0.05); AD knowledge was a significant predictor at 6 months only (P=0.048). No other predictors were significant. CONCLUSION: 'ABCs of AD' has immediate and sustained effects on paramedics' knowledge of attitudes toward and perceived pressure from patients to use the AD-CPGs. Updates to paramedic patient care guidelines and standards are needed to increase paramedics' perceived control and self-efficacy to implement the guidelines, and their intentions to use the AD-CPGs. SPONSORSHIP: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (2011-CIHR- 260877).

publication date

  • February 2017