Interactions of thermally denatured fibrinogen on polyethylene with plasma proteins and platelets Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • During the investigation of fibrin deposition onto hydrophobic polymers in contact with human blood, a model was developed in which fibrinogen was denatured and irreversibly coated onto a polyethylene surface by heating to 70 degrees C for 10 min. The denatured fibrinogen-polyethylene surface is resistant to fluid wall shear rates of up to 550 s-1 and the fibrinogen does not desorb in the presence of plasma proteins. Compared to uncoated polyethylene, little albumin or fibrinogen adsorbs to heat-denatured fibrinogen. Thrombin binds to the denatured fibrinogen-coated polyethylene with low affinity and also acts on the surface-bound denatured fibrinogen and cleaves fibrinopeptide A (FPA) quantitatively. Washed, 51Cr-labeled platelets do not adhere to the thermally denatured fibrinogen at either low or high shear rates compared to surfaces coated with undenatured fibrinogen (p < 0.01). These observations support the role of the D domain of fibrinogen in platelet adhesion because this is the region that is denatured by heating. In contrast, the E domain of fibrinogen is not altered by heating to 70 degrees C and hence remains susceptible to thrombin and/or plasmin cleavage. The characteristics of this surface are such that it can be used to develop fibrin-coated surfaces for use in studies of thrombus formation on artificial surfaces.

publication date

  • December 1992