Pain as an important predictor of psychosocial health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the evolution of psychosocial aspects of health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and to identify their predictors. METHODS: All patients within a Swiss RA cohort and a US RA cohort who completed a Short Form 36 (SF-36) scale at least twice within a 4-year period were included. The primary outcome was psychosocial health as measured by the mental component summary (MCS) score of the SF-36. The evolution of this outcome over time was analyzed using structural equation models, which distinguish between the stable, the variable, and the measurement error components of the outcome's variance. RESULTS: A total of 15,282 patients (48,323 observations) were included. MCS scores were mostly stable over time (between 69% and 75% of the variance was not due to measurement error). The variable component of the SF-36 was mostly due to fluctuations at the moment of measurement and not to a global time trend of psychosocial health. Pain was the most important predictor of both the stable and variable components of psychosocial health, explaining ∼44% of the observed psychosocial health variance. CONCLUSION: This large cohort study demonstrates that pain is the most important predictor of a patient's psychosocial health in RA patients. This suggests that physicians should place greater emphasis on pain management.

authors

  • Courvoisier, Delphine S
  • Agoritsas, Thomas
  • Glauser, Jérôme
  • Michaud, Kaleb
  • Wolfe, Fred
  • Cantoni, Eva
  • Perneger, Thomas V
  • Finckh, Axel
  • Swiss Clinical Quality Management Program for Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases

publication date

  • February 2012