Accuracy of measurements of small changes in soft tissue mass by use of dual-photon absorptiometry Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) has recently been applied to the assessment of body composition. To evaluate the accuracy of DPA in detecting small changes in the lean soft tissue mass, we performed DPA with the use of the Norland 2600 Dichromatic densitometer on six healthy adult males before and after a 30-ml/kg transfusion of saline and before and after exercise in a warm environment, resulting in a greater than or equal to 1-kg weight loss. Absolute weight [baseline pretransfusion r2 = 0.999, standard error of estimate (SEE) = 590 g; posttransfusion r2 = 0.999, SEE = 300 g; baseline pretranspiration r2 = 0.999, SEE = 230 g; posttranspiration r2 = 0.999, SEE = 240 g] was accurately reflected in DPA total mass. Weight changes due to transfusion were poorly reflected by changes in DPA total mass (r2 = 0.417, SEE = 404 g). However, changes posttranspiration were accurately reflected in the DPA total mass (r2 = 0.886, SEE = 106 g posttranspiration). Similarly, weight changes due to transfusion were poorly measured by changes in DPA soft mass (r2 = 0.478, SEE = 365 g), but changes posttranspiration were highly correlated with DPA soft mass changes (r2 = 0.909, SEE = 92 g). Weight changes were not reflected by changes in the DPA lean soft tissue mass (r2 = 0.006, SEE = 1,737 posttransfusion, r2 = 0.094, SEE = 1,038 g posttranspiration). DPA-derived nonfat mass was highly correlated with skinfold-derived nonfat mass (r2 = 0.96, SEE = 2,400 g). Accuracy of total and soft tissue measurements implied correct mineral mass assessment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • August 1991