Risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeding in living kidney donors Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Individuals with moderate-to-severe reduced renal function have greater risk of gastrointestinal bleeding than those with normal renal function. We conducted a retrospective matched cohort study to assess whether living kidney donors share a similar risk. We reviewed pre-donation charts for living kidney donations from 1992 to 2009 in Ontario, Canada, and linked this information to healthcare databases. We selected healthy non-donors from the general population and matched ten non-donors to every donor. Of the 2009 donors and 20,090 matched non-donors, none had evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding prior to cohort entry. The cohort was followed for a median of 8.4 yr (maximum 19.7 yr; loss to follow-up <7%). There was no significant difference in the rate of hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding in donors compared to non-donors (18.5 vs. 14.9 events per 10,000 person-years; rate ratio 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.81). Similar results were obtained when we assessed the time to first hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% CI 0.87-1.79). In conclusion, we found living kidney donation was not associated with a higher risk of hospitalization with gastrointestinal bleeding. These results are reassuring for the safety of the practice.

publication date

  • May 2014