Deciphering the pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy using proton pump inhibitors and a hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAID Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The small intestine is a significant site of ulceration and bleeding induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The pathogenesis is poorly understood. The present study explored the roles of bile, bacteria, and enterohepatic circulation to NSAID enteropathy, using both a conventional NSAID (naproxen) and a gastrointestinal-safe naproxen derivative (ATB-346), as well as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Rats were treated orally with naproxen or equimolar doses of ATB-346 over a 5-day period, with or without PPI administration, and intestinal damage was quantified. The cytotoxicity of bile from the rats was evaluated in vitro. Biliary excretion of naproxen and ATB-346 was determined. The impact of the NSAIDs and of PPIs on the composition of the intestinal microbiota was examined by deep sequencing of 16s rRNA. Naproxen caused significant intestinal damage and inflammation, whereas ATB-346 did not. Naproxen, but not ATB-346, dose dependently increased the cytotoxicity of bile, and it was further increased by PPI coadministration. Whereas biliary excretion of naproxen was significant in naproxen-treated rats, it was greatly reduced in rats treated with ATB-346. The enteric microbiota of naproxen-treated rats was distinct from that in vehicle- or ATB-346-treated rats, and PPI administration caused significant intestinal dysbiosis. The increase in cytotoxicity of bile induced by naproxen and PPIs may contribute significantly to intestinal ulceration and bleeding. Some of these effects may occur secondary to significant changes in the jejunal microbiota induced by both naproxen and PPIs.

authors

publication date

  • June 15, 2015