Oral calcium transiently increases calbindin9k gene expression in adult rat duodena Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In rat intestine, the 9 kilodalton calbindin (CaBP9K) is significantly increased in vivo by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1, 25(OH)2D3) through a vitamin D (D) response element located in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. However, in vitro calcium has also been reported to increase CaBP9K gene expression in fetal duodenal culture preparations. The aim of the studies was to investigate whether calcium feeding alone can influence CaBP9K gene expression in vivo in adult rat duodena by evaluating the pattern of expression of its mRNA following short- or long-term exposure to oral calcium, comparing the data to exposure to the known inducer of the gene, 1, 25(OH)2D3. Hypocalcemic D-depleted rats were acutely or chronically supplemented with calcium per os, or with 1,25(OH)2D3 in the presence or absence of oral calcium. Short-term calcium feeding was shown to significantly increase the expression of the CaBP9K gene to a level similar to that observed in 1,25(OH)2D3-treated rats but no additive effect between oral calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 on the level of its mRNA was observed. Moreover, the calcium effect on CaBP9K gene expression was shown to be independent of the circulating ionized calcium concentration and, contrary to the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3, not sustained following long-term exposure. Our data clearly indicate that oral calcium alone has a significant but only transient effect of the expression of the adult rat intestinal CaBP9K gene in vivo and that maintenance of its expression requires normalization of the D endocrine system.

publication date

  • January 1997