Seven-year clinical follow-up after lumbar disc surgery: results and predictors of outcome Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This study evaluates the 7-year outcome of lumbar disc surgery and the predictive value of pre- and perioperative risk factors. The 7-year follow-up rate of a sample of 122 patients was 93% (n = 114). Six per cent of the patients had undergone repeat surgery. Approximately 90% reported that they were satisfied with having undergone surgery. The clinical outcome was evaluated in 96 patients (54 men and 42 women) by means of patient-scores (VAS) of low back and leg pain, and a Clinical Overall Score (COS). In multivariate regression analyses, women were shown to have poorer outcome than men. Preoperative psychological distress and impaired fibrinolytic activity were predictors of poor 7-year outcome. Age, weight, smoking habits and physical fitness had no statistically significant prognostic value. Whether the patients were operated for one or two herniated discs, or whether surgery involved a full or partial laminectomy, did not influence the outcome significantly.

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publication date

  • January 1999