Urinary incontinence in Canada. National survey of family physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To determine current knowledge, attitudes, and management of urinary incontinence among family physicians in Canada. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Family physicians in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 1500 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-assessed knowledge, self-reported attitudes, and rating of various tests and treatments in the investigation and management of incontinence. RESULTS: The overall unadjusted response rate was 43.3% (650/1500). Although most respondents reported that urinary incontinence was common in their practices, less than half (46.0%, 284/617) indicated that they clearly understood incontinence and just 37.9% (232/612) had an organized plan for incontinence problems. Only 35.0% (214/612) of respondents felt very comfortable dealing with incontinence. Physical examination, urodynamic studies, urinalysis, and testing blood sugar levels were all considered important investigations by more than 90% of respondents. CONCLUSION: There are wide variations in knowledge, attitudes, practices, and comfort level among family physicians dealing with urinary incontinence.

publication date

  • January 2002