Orthopaedic Surgeons Prefer to Participate in Expertise-based Randomized Trials Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Empiric data and theoretical arguments suggest an alternative randomized clinical trial (RCT) design, called expertise-based RCT, has enhanced validity, applicability, and ethical integrity compared with conventional RCT. Little is known, however, about whether physicians will participate in an expertise-based RCT. In a cross-sectional survey of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons, we evaluated preference for and willingness to participate in an expertise-based versus a conventional RCT if given the opportunity to participate in a trial investigating the effectiveness of high tibial osteotomy versus unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Using an electronic survey ((c)2005 SurveyMonkey.com), we invited all 767 members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (2005) to participate; 276 surgeons completed the questionnaire (37.5% response rate). One hundred two surgeons (53.4%) were willing to participate in an expertise-based RCT compared with 35 surgeons (18.3%) willing to participate in a conventional RCT. Ninety-seven surgeons (52.4%) strongly or moderately preferred the expertise-based design compared with 25 (13.5%) who preferred the conventional design. For the clinical example we presented, the majority of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons were willing to participate in and preferred the expertise-based design. The expertise-based randomized clinical trial design may overcome some of the barriers to conducting clinical trials in orthopaedic surgery and improve the validity of their conclusions.

publication date

  • July 2008