Allergen-induced oxygen radical release from bronchoalveolar lavage cells and airway hyperresponsiveness in dogs. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Allergen inhalation causes airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in dogs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is associated with increases in oxygen radical production from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. A group of 10 random-source dogs were studied twice, 4 wk apart. On each occasion, acetylcholine (ACh) airway responsiveness was measured before and 24 h after inhalation of Ascaris suum or its diluent, followed by BAL. The response to ACh was expressed as the concentration causing an increase in lung resistance of 5 cm H2/O/L/s above baseline. Spontaneous and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated (2.4 mumol/L) oxygen radical release were measured, for 10 min each, from washed BAL cells (4 x 10(6) cells/ml) by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence in a luminometer at 37 degrees C. Superoxide anion production was measured using a cytochrome c assay. Allergen inhalation caused bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The acetylcholine provocative concentration fell from 7.47 mg/ml (% SEM 1.61) before to 1.23 mg/ml (% SEM 1.62) after allergen (p < 0.0001). Allergen inhalation significantly increased absolute neutrophil (p = 0.03) and eosinophil (p = 0.02) counts in BAL. Spontaneous (p < 0.0003) and PMA-stimulated (p < 0.0005) chemiluminescence and superoxide anion production (p = 0.039) were increased after allergen inhalation. The allergen-induced increases in chemiluminescence were significantly correlated with the increases in ACh airway hyperresponsiveness (r = 0.75, p < 0.012). These results indicate that inhaled allergen increases oxygen radical release from bronchoalveolar lavage cells and supports the hypothesis that oxygen radicals are important in causing allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

publication date

  • May 1995