Appendicular and whole body lean mass outcomes are associated with finite element analysis-derived bone strength at the distal radius and tibia in adults aged 40 years and older Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine how appendicular lean mass index (ALMI), and whole body lean (LMI) and fat mass indices (FMI) associate with estimated bone strength outcomes at the distal radius and tibia in adults aged 40 years and older. METHODS: Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were performed to determine body composition, including whole body lean and fat mass, and appendicular lean mass. ALMI (appendicular lean mass/height2), LMI (lean tissue mass/height2) and FMI (fat mass/height2) were calculated. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) scans were performed to assess bone structural properties at the distal radius and tibia. Using finite element analysis, failure load (N), stiffness (N/mm), ultimate stress (MPa), and cortical-to-trabecular load ratio were estimated from HRpQCT scans. The associations between body composition (ALMI, LMI, FMI) and estimated bone strength were examined using bivariate and multivariable linear regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, and other confounding variables. RESULTS: In 197 participants (127 women; mean±SD, age: 69.5±10.3y, body mass index: 27.95±4.95kg/m2, ALMI: 7.31±1.31kg/m2), ALMI and LMI were significantly associated with failure load at the distal radius and tibia (explained 39%-48% of the variance) and remained significant after adjusting for confounding variables and multiple testing (R2=0.586-0.645, p<0.001). ALMI, LMI, and FMI did not have significant associations with ultimate stress in our multivariable models. FMI was significantly associated with cortical-to-trabecular load ratio at the distal radius and tibia (explained 6%-12% of the variance) and remained significant after adjusting for confounders and multiple testing (R2=0.208-0.243, p<0.001). FMI was no longer significantly associated with failure load after adjusting for confounders. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that ALMI and LMI are important determinants of estimated bone strength, particularly failure load, at the distal radius and tibia, and may contribute to preservation of bone strength in middle-to-late adulthood.

authors

  • Gibbs, Jenna C
  • Giangregorio, Lora M
  • Wong, Andy Kin On
  • Josse, Robert G
  • Cheung, Angela M

publication date

  • October 2017

published in