Identifying and Assessing Depression in Prelingually Deaf People: A Literature Review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • IDENTIFYING AND ASSESSING DEPRESSION is essential to ensuring access to appropriate treatment and services. Unfortunately, limited literature exists on identifying and assessing depression in prelingually deaf people. In a literature review, the authors critically examined relevant published studies. The earliest reported information on depression in deaf people was found in historical studies that descriptively evaluated specialist psychiatric services for deaf people. These studies did not accurately reflect the prevalence of depression; reasons for this are discussed. Issues regarding assessment of depression in deaf people, such as communication, use of interpreters, and use of standardized assessments, are examined. Studies that have attempted to overcome these challenges are reviewed, including studies using modified versions of written questionnaires designed for hearing people and studies in which standardized questionnaires were translated and administered in sign. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods are highlighted; recommendations for future research are made.

publication date

  • 2006