Well-being implications of immobility during COVID-19: evidence from a student sample in Bangladesh using the satisfaction with life scale Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Immobility is known to impact health and well-being by reducing social contact, activity participation, and changing time use patterns. These unfortunate effects mostly affect specific demographic segments, including older adults, low income families, people who face disabilities, and those living in conflict zones. Emergency measures taken during the COVID-19 pandemic mandated or strongly recommended limitations to mobility, thereby causing this condition for segments of the public not usually characterized by high levels of immobility. In the context of the pandemic, reduced mobility was the non-pharmaceutical intervention of choice, and the evidence suggests that it helped to keep incidences of the disease from exploding. On the other hand, there is also a need to understand how mobility restrictions may have had incidental impacts, including to well-being, in population groups that have not been studied from this perspective before. In this spirit, the present paper uses the items of the Satisfaction with Life Scale to investigate how aspects of well-being changed during the pandemic, using a sample of 400 college and university students in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Analysis is based on multivariate ordered models and the results suggest that being less mobile, less active, and changes in activity time use due COVID-19 had an impact on the satisfaction with life of students. The detrimental effect was more marked for males and students from low-income households. Additionally, perceptions of residential characteristics and sense of belonging also correlate with satisfaction with life in the period under study.

publication date

  • May 16, 2023