The relationship between strength, power and ballistic performance Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The purpose of this investigation was to answer the question, "Does Stronger Mean Faster?". After a screening for elbow strength and speed, four groups of 8 subjects were selected for further investigation that fell into the extreme quartiles of the strength and speed continuums. The main investigation employed an apparatus that could freely rotate in the sagittal plane. Three isometric trials were performed at 60 degrees , 90 degrees and 120 degrees of elbow extension. Dynamic trials were performed with relative resistances (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80%), determined from the lowest maximum isometric torque produced from the three joint angles mentioned above, and absolute resistances of 1.1 kg and 2.2 kg. A 1:1 relationship between strength and speed was not established (r=0.498). Normalized peak power proved to be the best kinetic variable for predicting peak velocity (r ranging between 0.793 and 0.918). Individuals with similar peak torques were compared and the patterns of torque development, whether torques peaked early or late during the movement, physiologically agreed with known theoretically established mechanical responses. Similar velocities were also achieved with different peak torques demonstrating a timing issue. Estimated fibre-typing could not account for the performance differences.

publication date

  • April 2009