Hirntumor und Kopfschmerz Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • METHODS: The possible association of brain tumour with headache was investigated in 100 patients seen for brain surgery. Preoperatively, 43 patients suffered from headache. These patients were thoroughly questioned about the nature of their pain. Investigation included the McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: In only 11 of the patients was headache the primary symptom of a brain tumour. Pain intensity was found to be lower in patients with brain tumour then in those with extracranial tumours or headache of other origins. Female subjects, patients under 50 years of age and those with elevated intracranial pressure experienced more intensive pain. Diurnal variation in pain intensity was observed in 60% of patients with headache. There was no evidence, however, of an association with elevated intracranial pressure. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigations yielded new information concerning the epidemology of headache accompanying brain tumours. Headache is not an early cardinal symptom of brain tumours, as was generally believed earlier. With the help of the McGill Pain Questionnaire a fine quantitative and qualitative characterization of headache of different origins could be made. The connection between tumour localization and pain lateralization, as well as the possible mechanisms of intracranial pain projection was extensively analysed. The interpretations of the results are at best hypotheses and they do not help determine why more than half of the patients with brain tumour did not experience headache.

publication date

  • September 1994