Role of calcium in the control of steroidogenesis in preovulatory ovarian follicles of the goldfish Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • The possible involvement of calcium in the regulation of steroidogenesis in the goldfish was investigated using preovulatory ovarian follicles incubated in vitro. Incubation of follicles in media deficient in calcium impaired testosterone production in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in both the presence and the absence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Similarly, addition of calcium channel antagonists (verapamil, nifedipine, nicardipine, and CoCl2) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of hCG-stimulated testosterone production. TMB-8, an inhibitor of intracellular calcium mobilization, also suppressed hCG-stimulated testosterone production. Basal testosterone production was not affected by incubation in calcium-deficient media or with drugs which reduce intracellular calcium availability. In other studies, nifedipine blocked forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP-stimulated testosterone production suggesting that one of the major sites of calcium action is distal to cyclic AMP generation. Two inhibitors of calmodulin, W5 and W7, significantly inhibited hCG-stimulated testosterone production. These findings suggest that calcium derived from intracellular and extracellular pools participate in the expression of gonadotropin effects on steroid production in goldfish ovarian follicles and that these effects are mediated intracellularly by interaction with calmodulin.

publication date

  • February 1991