Path analysis of income, coping and health at the local level in a Canadian context Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • This article explores the relationships between social, physical, and sociodemographic characteristics and the health status of individuals within four contrasting neighbourhoods in Hamilton, Ontario, using a cross-sectional design. Using data from a telephone survey conducted in 2001 and 2002 of a random sample of adults (1504 respondents, response rate = 60%), path analysis was used to estimate direct and indirect effects of neighbourhood location and satisfaction on health; specifically, the effect of income, coping skills, and neighbourhood satisfaction on self-rated health. Coping was found to be an important mediator between several lifestyle and neighbourhood characteristics and health outcomes. Income and other measures of wealth such as housing tenure, employment, money worries, and lack of money/food bank use were found significant in all health outcomes as well as daily coping ability. Since coping ability was found to be more important for health status than income, policy implications include a greater emphasis on social programmes to assist individuals to manage stress, as well as income support.

publication date

  • November 2007