Phonological and semantic information in word and nonword reading in a deep dyslexic patient. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Deep dyslexia is diagnosed when brain-injured, previously literate adults make reading errors that include hallmark semantic paralexias (e.g., reading HEART as BLOOD) and are also impaired at reading nonwords (e.g., FRIP). The diversity of these symptoms have led most researchers to conclude that there are multiple sources of impairment in this syndrome and that one of the most critical is a failure to process phonological information at a sublexical level. The patient (SD) reported in this study fits the deep dyslexia profile to the extent that she makes several semantically related reading errors. She also shows the classic frequency and image ability effects of the syndrome. However, as we report, she does read some nonwords correctly and she shows a strong advantage for naming when phonemic cues are presented. We discuss the performance of SD, on these preliminary tasks, in terms of a phonological selection impairment.

publication date

  • June 2000