Insulinlike growth factor I receptors in rabbit gastrointestinal tract Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Insulinlike growth factor I is a potent mitogen with insulinlike metabolic effects. Insulinlike growth factor I is synthesized in the liver, intestine, and other organs. Insulinlike growth factor I receptors are widely distributed and structurally similar to insulin receptors. Frozen sections of rabbit gastrointestinal tract were incubated in buffer containing 40 pmol/L [125I]insulinlike growth factor I. Binding was saturable, temperature- and time-dependent, and reversible. Saturation binding experiments showed a single class of high-affinity receptors (Kd = 0.9 nmol/L, Bmax = 0.36 pmol/mg protein). The IC50s for insulinlike growth factor I and insulinlike growth factor II were 3 nmol/L and 90 nmol/L, respectively; whereas insulin at 1-3 mumol/L displaced 50% of specific binding. Autoradiography of insulinlike growth factor I binding demonstrated significant differences in receptor density in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, epithelium of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. These results indicate that a single class of specific, high-affinity insulinlike growth factor I receptors were distributed in muscular and mucosal layers of the entire rabbit gastrointestinal tract. Insulinlike growth factor I is likely to be an important local mediator of intestinal growth and metabolism.

publication date

  • July 1990