Sweat lactate in exercising children and adolescents of varying physical maturity Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This study attempts to explain some of the individual variability in sweating pattern by comparing prepubescents and pubescents. Sweating rate and muscular anaerobic capacity are higher in adults than in children; thus we hypothesized that sweat gland anaerobic metabolism, as reflected by lactate excretion, might be higher with advanced physical maturity (PM). Lactate concentration in sweat ([LAC]sw) was measured at various stages of PM in boys who exercised in the heat. The subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of Tanner staging: prepubertal (PP, n = 16), midpubertal (MP, n = 15), and late pubertal (LP, n = 5). Subjects cycled at 50% of maximal O2 uptake for three 20-min bouts, with 10-min rest periods, in 42 degrees C and 18% relative humidity. Sweat samples were harvested, and population density of activated sweat glands was determined after each exercise bout. [LAC]sw during bout 1 was higher in PP than in LP [PP = 22.2 +/- 2.2, MP = 19.5 +/- 1.4, LP = 14.3 +/- 1.3 (SE) mmol/l]. In all groups, [LAC]sw decreased during subsequent bouts, and there were no intergroup differences in [LAC]sw during bout 3 (PP = 11.2 +/- 0.4, MP = 10.6 +/- 0.5, LP = 9.7 +/- 0.2 mmol/l). [LAC]sw was inversely related to sweating rate. Lactate excretion rate per gland was greater with the increase in PM (PP = 61.0 +/- 8.2, MP = 79.1 +/- 11.3, LP = 99.9 +/- 11.0 pmol/min; P = 0.08).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • November 1991