Aldosterone and prolactin response to exercise in the heat in circumpubertal boys Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Thermoregulatory responses to exercise in the heat, especially sweating pattern, differ between children and adults. To determine whether such differences may be related to hormonal responses and to assess the possible association between this response and physical maturation, three groups of circumpubertal boys cycled at 50% of maximal O2 uptake (three 20-min bouts with 10 min of rest between bouts) in 42 degrees C at 20% relative humidity. On the basis of Tanner staging, 11 were prepubertal (PP), 12 midpubertal (MP), and 7 late pubertal (LP). Water ingestion was encouraged to minimize dehydration. Venous blood was sampled before and immediately after the session. Changes in heart rate, rectal temperature, and percent decrease in plasma volume did not differ among groups. There was no change in plasma osmolality in any of the groups. Resting testosterone concentrations were higher with increased level of physical maturity (PP = 0.4 +/- 0.1, MP = 8.2 +/- 1.9, LP = 13.8 +/- 1.2 nmol/l; P less than 0.05). In all groups, both aldosterone (ALD) and prolactin (PRL) markedly increased after exercise in the heat (ALD: PP = 161 +/- 40 vs. 1,289 +/- 263, MP = 173 +/- 47 vs. 1,245 +/- 153, LP = 250 +/- 76 vs. 1,681 +/- 400 pmol/l; PRL: PP = 8.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 24.9 +/- 4.2, MP = 8.8 +/- 1.0 vs. 22.0 +/- 8.9, LP = 8.4 +/- 0.8 vs. 39.0 +/- 3.6 micrograms/l; P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

publication date

  • November 1991