Chronic toxicity of silver nitrate to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, and potential mitigating factors Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We investigated the chronic toxicity of Ag, as silver nitrate, using two freshwater aquatic cladoceran species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, to generate data for the development of a chronic ambient water quality criterion for Ag. Preliminary studies with C. dubia showed variable results which were related to the equilibration time between food and silver. Follow-up testing was conducted using a 3h equilibration time, which stabilized dissolved Ag concentrations and the toxicity of Ag(+). Results with C. dubia conducted individually (1 per cup, n=10) and in mass (30 per chamber, n=2) gave similar results once similar standardized equilibration times were used. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of Ag to C. dubia and D. magna was 9.61 and 3.00microg dissolved Ag/L, respectively. The chronic toxicity of Ag(+) to C. dubia was also evaluated in the presence of: (1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and (2) sulfide. The addition of DOC (0.4mg/L) resulted in a approximately 50% decrease in toxicity while the addition of sulfide (75.4nM) deceased toxicity by 42%. Whole-body Ag concentration in D. magna was positively correlated with increased levels of Ag exposure, however; we observed a non-statistical decrease in whole-body Na levels, an estimator of sodium homeostasis.

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publication date

  • August 2007