Phenylboronic acid modified hydrogel materials and their potential for use in contact lens based drug delivery Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The use of hydrogel-based contact lens materials holds promise for ophthalmic drug delivery by increasing drug residence time, improving drug bioavailability, reducing administration frequency, and enhancing special site targeting. Issues such as ease of manufacturing, lens comfort and appropriate release kinetics must be considered. Furthermore, the high water content of hydrogel materials can result in rapid and poorly controlled release kinetics. Herein, we modified common hydrogels used in contact lens manufacturing with phenylboronic acid (PBA). PBA addresses these material design issues since boronate esters are easily formed when boron acid and diols interact, opening up a pathway for simple modification of the model lens materials with saccharide based wetting agents. The wetting agents have the potential to improve lens comfort. Furthermore, the hydrophobicity of PBA and the presence of diols can be useful to help control drug release kinetics. In this work, polymerizable 3-(acrylamido)phenylboronic acid (APBA) was synthesized and incorporated into various hydrogels used in contact lens applications, including poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and poly(N,N-dimethyl acrylamide) (PDMA) using UV induced free radical polymerization. The APBA structure and its incorporation into the hydrogel materials were confirmed by NMR and FTIR. The materials were shown to interact with and bind wetting agents such as hyaluronan (HA) and hydroxypropyl guar (HPG) by simple soaking in an aqueous solution. The equilibrium water content of the modified materials was characterized, demonstrating that most materials are still in the appropriate range after the introduction of the hydrophobic PBA. The release of three model ophthalmic drugs with varying hydrophilicity, atropine, atropine sulfate and dexamethasone, was examined. The presence of PBA in the materials was found to promote sustained drug release due to its hydrophobic nature. The results suggest that the modification of the materials with PBA was able to not only provide a mucoadhesive property that enhanced wetting agent interactions with the materials, but had the potential to alter drug release. Thus, the modification of contact lens materials with mucoadhesive functionality may be useful in the design of hydrogel contact lenses for ophthalmic drug release and wetting agent binding.

publication date

  • October 13, 2022

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