Evaluation of delay discounting as a transdiagnostic research domain criteria indicator in 1388 general community adults Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Abstract Background The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach proposes a novel psychiatric nosology using transdiagnostic dimensional mechanistic constructs. One candidate RDoC indicator is delay discounting (DD), a behavioral economic measure of impulsivity, based predominantly on studies examining DD and individual conditions. The current study sought to evaluate the transdiagnostic significance of DD in relation to several psychiatric conditions concurrently. Methods Participants were 1388 community adults (18–65) who completed an in-person assessment, including measures of DD, substance use, depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Relations between DD and psychopathology were examined with three strategies: first, examining differences by individual condition using clinical cut-offs; second, examining DD in relation to latent psychopathology variables via principal components analysis (PCA); and third, examining DD and all psychopathology simultaneously via structural equation modeling (SEM). Results Individual analyses revealed elevations in DD were present in participants screening positive for multiple substance use disorders (tobacco, cannabis, and drug use disorder), ADHD, major depressive disorder (MDD), and an anxiety disorder (ps < 0.05–0.001). The PCA produced two latent components (substance involvement v. the other mental health indicators) and DD was significantly associated with both (ps < 0.001). In the SEM, unique significant positive associations were observed between the DD latent variable and tobacco, cannabis, and MDD (ps < 0.05–0.001). Conclusions These results provide some support for DD as a transdiagnostic indicator, but also suggest that studies of individual syndromes may include confounding via comorbidities. Further systematic investigation of DD as an RDoC indicator is warranted.

publication date

  • January 26, 2022