Indigenous women’s experiences of cervical cancer screening: Incorporating Indigenous ways of knowing into a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative research Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Due to historical and contextual factors, cervical cancer is typically detected at a later stage in Indigenous women, and so has higher morbidity and mortality. Increasing participation in cervical cancer screening (CCS) could ameliorate this health inequity by detecting cancer when it is more easily treatable. To understand the perspectives, preferences, and experiences of Indigenous women related to participation in CCS, we conducted a systematic review and meta-synthesis of nine qualitative research studies. To advance decolonised qualitative evidence synthesis approaches, we use a modified version of the Two Row Wampum-Covenant Chain Tradition, a Haudenosaunee two-eyed seeing analytic approach that integrates Western approaches with Indigenous worldviews. Using the metaphor of a network of forest plants, we illustrate the systemic and topical barriers and facilitators to CCS, as reported by Indigenous women. We use this metaphor to reiterate the importance of all levels of change to improve CCS experiences for Indigenous women.

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publication date

  • November 2, 2022